Longwood Gardens Part 5

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SOLSC Day 11

There is so much more to see at Longwood Gardens besides the conservatory.  So let’s move on to something else on the grounds.

Today we will tour the Peirce-du Pont House.  It dates from 1730 and is the oldest building at Longwood Gardens. It was the family homestead of the Peirce family until 1905 and then became the weekend residence of Pierre du Pont from 1906 until his death in 1954.  As you will see, this is just a simple home just like any weekend home you or I may have.

Here is what the house looks like.  Quite simple and tasteful.

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The first thing we checked out was the library.  I was sure I had taken pictures but I can’t find any.  Old age.  I must have just taken them in my mind.  Anyway, picture wooden shelves lining the walls and the shelves loaded with books.  Picture  a piano in one corner. Against one wall there was a map chest.  I wonder if my Google maps would fit in it?  One thing I did get a picture of inside the library was this miniature room which was displayed behind glass.

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As you can see, the candles are the kind you would use on a birthday cake.  Here are some more minis displayed right above this room.

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My cat would have a ball with these.

Moving on to the entrance hall we can see a stairway leading to the second floor and suitcases at the bottom waiting to be loaded in a car to be taken to the train station.

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Although many of the rooms have modern conveniences in them the flavor of the house can still be seen.  Here are a couple of sitting areas.

There were several fireplaces throughout the house.  Here is one.

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Behind this one is the kitchen pantry.

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Since we all have pantries in our homes, let’s look at this one.  The first thing I noticed was the warming oven, oh so necessary when preparing a large meal.

 

It is important that we keep all of our good silverware safe so of course we need a place to lock them away when not in use.  Here is the silverware safe.

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I don’t know about you, but I don’t think there is any thing worse than trying to dry dishes with cold dish towels that get wet quickly.  So, I am sure that you, just like me make good use of the towel warmer.

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I guess my hand was unsteady when I took this picture, but it can still be read.

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Coming back outside we see a porch.  I am sure that this was a wonderful place to sit and relax.

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Tomorrow we will finish up our tour of the Gardens with other interesting things to see on its grounds.

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24 Comments

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24 responses to “Longwood Gardens Part 5

  1. I love touring this kind of houses- here in Indy, one is on the grounds of our art museum- the Lilly house, home of the family that found the Eli Lilly pharmaceutical and research company. When I lived in Portland, OR, it was the Pittock Mansion. In North Carolina, there is the Biltmore. Those are a few that stand out.

  2. Judy C.

    I love it! Thanks for the tour. Maybe a towel warmer would be a great addition to our kitchen, but then that would mean that I would have to dry the dishes!

  3. Well, this was certainly a surprise and delight. I had no idea the conservatory had a house too! I love the ivy on the outside of the house. I can’t wait to visit on my own sometime, sometime soon I hope!

  4. I love touring old homes, learning about how they lived. I don;t think I’ve ever seen a towel warmer in any of the houses I’ve seen before. It’s be nice to have warm towels after a shower.

  5. lindabaie

    I’ve seen those old pantries before & marvel at them, but I’ve never seen one with a silver safe and towel warmer. What luxury those people lived in! And that miniature room, wow! I’ve always thought it would be fun to have a real dollhouse & create things for it. This is fabulous. What a day you had!

  6. Well, that is some house! That silverware safe was interesting – it looks to be about the size of my home office, although much more sparkly 🙂

  7. What a beautiful home! Thanks for the tour – I so love to see these old treasured homes – a mini history lesson!

  8. Oh my, they were rich! It’s hard to imagine living in something so grand.

  9. A nice little trip into the past. I enjoy touring old homes. I forgot about silverware safes.

  10. How THAT’s a house. Wowzer!

    I just love your voice in this one – the comments were just great.

  11. I really enjoyed your commentary in this post, too! Have you ever considering being a tour guide? 🙂 My favorite is the cat line.

  12. That staircase is an engineerial feet. It is just beautifully sweeping.

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