Remembering the Oldies

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SOL August 11, 2015

Listening to a current recording artist during a televised concert on a morning show a few weeks ago I was left saddened and concerned.  For every word she uttered the next 5 or 6 words were bleeped.  As a result I have no idea what the song was about and frankly I don’t think I want to know.

I was saddened because this song is going to be someone’s “oldie” in the near future.  I was concerned because I could just picture some grandparent in the future singing this oldie to his/her grandchild.

I started longing for the some of the songs I listened to and sang along to (but only in my head) as I was growing up.  These songs were basically happy songs would good moral value.

Who cold forget Dickie Lee’s love song about Laurie? Who wouldn’t want to fall in love with a ghost (…I saw my sweater lying there upon her grave…)  Or how about his other lovely song about suicide…Patches (…It may not be right, but I’ll join you tonight, Patches I’m coming to you),

As long as we are on the subject of suicide, how about that uplifting song about a suicide pact, Running Bear by Johnny Preston (As their hands touched and their lips met the raging river pulled them down now they’ll always be together
In their happy hunting ground.)

I remember when Tom Jones hit the music scene and women all over would throw things at him while he was on stage.  They all really loved him, except maybe for Delilah (I felt the knife in my hand and she laughed no more.)

Speaking of murder let’s not forget Indiana Wants Me by R. Dean Taylor (If a man ever needed dying he did…)

We also had songs about bullying.  Cher’s Half Breed comes to mind. (The White Man always called me “Indian Squaw”.)  Staying with Cher, what about Gyspys, Tramps and Theives? (Gyspys, Tramps and Theives We’d hear it from the people of the town…)

Oh yes, how these songs warm my heart.  It is a shame that songs now-a-days don’t teach the same values and respect as did the songs of yesteryear.

These are only a few.  What wonderful “oldies” can you add to the list?

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13 Comments

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13 responses to “Remembering the Oldies

  1. Very funny – now I am going to have to go back and look up so oldies but not goldies for your list.

  2. I think it’s natural for people to long for the past: “So we beat on, boats against the current, born back ceaselessly into the past,” says Fitzgerald at the end of “The Great Gatsby.”

    That said, I do think the music industry needs a return to quality, but there are artists who sing “message” songs. I’m a fan of Taylor Swift’s empowering anthems. Artists like Green Day (“Wake Me Up Before September Ends”), Colbie Caillat (“Try”), Nico and Vinz (“Am I Wrong”) all sing important messages/stories.

    I grew up in the 70s and remember other catch tunes w/ less than affirming messages. For example, “Afternoon Delight.” I like the song, but it is a sex rant.

  3. I had to laugh at your list, and many of the country songs my husband likes came to mind – drinkin’, cheatin’, lyin’, dying’….all to a fairly upbeat riff. I don’t get these lyrics, give me “Moon River” any day…and a huckleberry friend. Whatever that is.

  4. Your list really was funny. I never realized there was so many songs about suicide and murder. As for me, give me some Ella and Louis or Frank singing some Cole Porter or Gershwin or Sondheim.

  5. The mention of country songs in Tara’s comment brought to mind one of the ultimate insults: “Here’s a quarter, call someone who cares…”

  6. Seems we both wrote about music today. Yours brought quite a chuckle. Each generation has its love songs…and its sad songs….and songs that really don’t make much sense. I fear I have not followed much of the music of today for the last few years…but I am sure there has to be a few songs out there that grandparents will be able to sing to their grandchildren. Now you have me singing Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves in my head…thanks. 🙂

  7. Songs aren’t all buttercups and sunshine, they are written and sung from the heart, but do we have to listen to foul language? I would hope not. Perhaps those won’t survive the test of time. I love the way you can spin a thought, always with humor.

  8. I love tunes, old and new and wow, I can’t think of my faves right now, but the wood is burning! I think every generation starches their heads… Beatles, Stones left my parents cold.

  9. Judy C.

    Great slice – loved the way you spun the songs and gentle reminders of what we all enjoyed in our younger years. Each generation seems to have their own unique music. Hopefully, the songs from this generation will not be lullabies for our great grandchildren.

  10. mrssurridge

    This reminds me of the movie/play “Grease”. When I first saw it I thought it was wonderful, fun, wholesome. I was surprised when, as an adult, I actually realized that the happy ending was really quite a celebration of naughtiness. And I completely choose to ignore the real meaning behind Hotel California! Loved your very thought-provoking post.

  11. My dad once nearly lost his mind when he misunderstood some of the lyrics of a Rod Stewart song my sister was playing on her boom box (1980s). My sister convinced him not to throw her cassette tape away. Thanks for your post! Now that I have teenage sons, I find myself acting a great deal like my dad!!!!

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